Who We Are · Press · Login · Contact
Newsletter
feed

Anthony Holloway

Anthony Holloway – Owner of K9Cuisine stumbled into the pet food industry after struggling to find a consistent source of good food for his Yellow Lab, Daisy, who has grain allergies. Finding none to his satisfaction, he decided to create his own solution-K9Cuisine.com! An entrepreneur at heart, Anthony now enjoys helping families make life a little easier-and their pets a whole lot healthier.

PawFun blog posts by Anthony Holloway

Is Rawhide Safe for Your Dog? Short Answer: No!

Rawhide is sold in just about every pet store – often in many different varieties. It’s a staple in most households with pets.

Rawhide could not only be dangerous, it could actually be lethal according to many blogs, organizations, and veterinarians.

Here’s what you need to know before you give your dog rawhide.

What is rawhide? According to Pet Planet, a franchise that prides itself on being well-versed in canine health, rawhide is the tough inner layer of bull, cow, water buffalo and horse hides. It is essentially a byproduct of the meat industry.

What are the dangers of rawhide? First of all, rawhide is not considered a food item. Thus, it is not covered by any labeling, processing, or content laws, and it may contain chemical preservatives. According to Associated Content, imported rawhide chews often contain toxins including arsenic, lead, titanium oxide, formaldehyde, chromium salts, mercury, cadmium and bromine. Even with the use of these highly questionable preservatives, the FDA reports that Salmonella has been detected in some of the imported chews. In the US and Canada, refrigerated trucks provide safer transport and the hides are generally only treated with hydrogen peroxide and a water rinse.

In addition to the chemical risk, rawhide can swell up to four times its original size in your dog’s stomach and cause life-threatening blockages. And dogs can chew off and swallow large pieces of rawhide which can get stuck in their esophagus, stomach, or intestines. This almost always requires surgical removal. In the terrible light of realizing too late, many dog lovers have posted warnings and alternatives on their websites, like The Northeastern Boxer Rescue who lost a gorgeous dog named Maxwell because of a blockage caused by a rawhide chew. (more…)

Ask the Pet Food Expert: Help! My cat only likes a brand I can’t find!

pamperedcatA Pawfun Blog reader Sarah Rockett writes: I have a diabetic cat who has been off of insulin for the last two years thanks to a carnivore diet.

However, he is an extremely picky eater. When he was first diagnosed, he refused to eat wet food, but I was finally able to find a wet food that he liked: Evangers (only the holistic pheasant and seafood dinners). Unfortunately, I am not able to get Evangers pet food any longer, and am now having to search for a new pet food to feed him, but cannot find another brand that he will eat.

He doesn’t like anything that resembles people food, unless its thin deli sliced turkey meat. I’ve tried just about every brand that the pet food stores carry, poultry and seafood flavors. Either the pet food is too much like people food and he won’t eat it, or the pate is too fine and he won’t eat it.

I’ve even tried mixing 1/4 teaspoon of other brands in with the Evangers, but he won’t eat it. I even have to change spoons when dishing out his food if I feed our other cat something that is not Evangers pheasant or seafood dinner. Do you have any advice on what is so special about Evangers pet food that I may be able to find in another brand? Thanks!

Pawfun’s Pet Food Expert, Anthony Holloway, president of K9Cuisine.com says: Why cats like one variety of food over another is one of the mysteries of the universe. We have both of the Evangers cat foods in stock. If this is what works you could stick with it. Also Orijen has a Six-Fish Cat food now that may work. Orijen’s is a dry cat food.

Pampered cat Image: Tails of Whimsy

Water Basics for your Pooch

dog Dogs need constant access to fresh water. In fact, water is the most important of all nutrients. But, did you know that too much water can cause your dog as much harm as too little?

Here are the water basics for dogs:
1) Water bowls should be cleaned daily to avoid any potentially dangerous bacterial growth. Ceramic is healthier than plastic for your pet’s food and water bowls.

2) The quality of the water is also important. It is not necessary to buy bottled water for your dog. Tap water is drinkable for dogs, just as it is for humans.

Dehydration can be deadly. An animal can loose all of its fat and half of its protein and survive, but only a 10% loss of body water causes serious illness, and a 15% loss could cause death.

TOO MUCH water can cause water toxicity! This is called hyponatremia. Be sure to monitor your dog as he or she drinks after exercising, watching for signs of water toxicity, which include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, or loss of appetite.

In either of the two cases, call your vet immediately.

Remember: A hydrated dog is a happy dog!

Brought to you by Pawfun.com

Ask the Pet Nutrition Expert: What Human Foods Can Kill My Dog?

dog_beggingIf you who own a dog, you’ve surely thought about treating her to the leftovers from the dinner table. What you may not realize is that some human foods pose dire threats to dogs.

Obvious things like sharp animal bones could potentially damage the digestive tract. But a number of common foods are simply incompatible with their bodies.

What can’t I feed my dog?
Grapes and raisins: Even a few grapes and raisins are poisonous to dogs and could cause kidney damage. Although it is not certain what component of grapes is toxic to dogs, according to ASPCA dogs that have ingested anywhere from a single serving to a pound of grapes (or raisins) have developed acute renal failure.

Symptoms:
• Typically within a few hours of ingestion, the dog begins to vomit. Partially digested grapes can be found in the mess, and also in their fecal matter.
• Following this, dogs generally will become lethargic and refuse food.
• Without immediate veterinary care, dogs may not survive the poisoning due to the damage to their kidneys. And, in some cases, even with timely care, they could still needed to be euthanized.

This is not to say you should rush your dog to the vet if it accidentally ingests a grape or two, but you should certainly call your vet if dog downs a handful of grapes or even fewer raisins.

Coffee, tea and cola: Most dogs owners have heard that feeding a dog chocolate can result in death. But it’s not only chocolate that is harmful. Other foods that contain theobromine, caffeine, or theophylline can induce vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, or irregular heart rhythm – even seizures, coma, or death. (more…)

Is Rawhide Safe for Your Dog?

Rawhide is sold in just about every pet store – often in many different varieties. It’s a staple in most households with pets. Yet many blogs, organizations, and veterinarians warn that rawhide could not only be dangerous, it could actually be lethal. Here’s what you need to know before you give your dog rawhide.

What is rawhide? According to Pet Planet, a franchise that prides itself on being well-versed in canine health, rawhide is the tough inner layer of bull, cow, water buffalo and horse hides. It is essentially a byproduct of the meat industry.

What are the dangers of rawhide? First of all, rawhide is not considered a food item. Thus, it is not covered by any labeling, processing, or content laws, and it may contain chemical preservatives. According to Associated Content, imported rawhide chews often contain toxins including arsenic, lead, titanium oxide, formaldehyde, chromium salts, mercury, cadmium and bromine. Even with the use of these highly questionable preservatives, the FDA reports that Salmonella has been detected in some of the imported chews. In the US and Canada, refrigerated trucks provide safer transport and the hides are generally only treated with hydrogen peroxide and a water rinse.

In addition to the chemical risk, rawhide can swell up to four times its original size in your dog’s stomach and cause life-threatening blockages. And dogs can chew off and swallow large pieces of rawhide which can get stuck in their esophagus, stomach, or intestines. This almost always requires surgical removal. In the terrible light of realizing too late, many dog lovers have posted warnings and alternatives on their websites, like The Northeastern Boxer Rescue who lost a gorgeous dog named Maxwell because of a blockage caused by a rawhide chew. (more…)